Tel: 0771 1883072
 Tel: 0771 1883072

HELP! I'VE FOUND A BABY KESTREL, HAWK, FALCON, WHAT SHALL I DO?

KEEP IT SAFE

KEEP IT WARM

KEEP IT QUIET

RING A RESCUE ASAP

KESTRELS:-

Baby kestrels disturbed when a farmer moved high bales of straw

This is Kezzy.  She was found by a little girl in the middle of a lawn.  

 

No-one knew where she had come from nor how she had got there.  The only explanation is that Kezzy was predated and dropped.

 

WHAT TO FEED A BABY BIRD OF PREY:

 

Very young birds of prey should be offered small pieces of chopped day old chick, dipped in water. 

 

These male hatchery chicks can be purchased from a Pet Store and must be completely defrosted.  With kitchen scissors, remove head, legs and yolk sak.  Chop the muscle and intestines into  small pieces dipping each piece into water before offering the food using plastic forceps. A calcium supplement can also be sprinkled on the meat to help build strong bones.

 

REMEMBER HOWEVER ! Never feed a cold, starving bird of prey.  It must be warmed up first. Food, as described above, should be given little by little, taking care not to overburden the bird's weakened system.

TOP TIP : To avoid SPLAYED legs, young birds of prey must be placed on a makeshift nest with a towel placed over the nest on to which their talons can grip.  Under no circumstances should a young bird of prey be placed on shiny newspaper.

Beautiful Kezzy as a juvenile - now in an outside aviary

HOW OFTEN SHOULD YOU FEED?

 

Young birds of prey should be fed every 3 or 4 hours between the hours of 7am and 7pm.  

 

The baby should be weighed daily to ensure it is receiving sufficient food.  As the young bird grows the amount of food should be increased.

 

Birds of prey do regurgitate pellets, so do not be alarmed.

An adult kestrel (not Kezzy)

BUZZARDS:-

ADULT SPARROW HAWK

 

Sparrow hawks have bright yellow eyes and are bigger than a kestrel.  They are often seen in gardens where they lay in wait for smaller birds, such as thrushes and blackbirds, before striking with extreme speed.

The mighty Gos Hawk

Print Print | Sitemap
The Wildlife Orphanage, located off the A19 between Selby and York, is a small wildlife rescue specialising in the care of young wild animals and birds.

APRIL 2017 

On the 1st April, a female hedgehog was admitted with lacerations and a broken leg. These were caused by a dog attack. The leg had to be amputated 

MARCH 2017

 

Hedgehogs are starting to emerge in the Yorkshire area.  Many are very poorly and need help immediately. Please ring 07711883072 if you spot a hedgehog looking weak and wobbly.

FEBRUARY2017

 

Have you lost this beautiful bunny?

 

Found on the main road at Eggborough and handed in to the police station. Please ring 07711883072 if this rabbit is yours. 

JANUARY 2017

 

Happy New Year everyone!

 

2017 looks like it's going to be a very busy year for the Wildlife Orphanage.  Please ring us immediately you spot a wild animal or bird in distress.  Time is always of the essence when dealing with wildlife.

 

WITH VERY BEST WISHES, AND HERE'S TO A GOOD ONE 

NEWS DECEMBER 2016

Newsletter 2016 has now been published

The weather has finally turned with freezing temperatures and hard ground frosts. Yet the rescue is still admitting little hedgehogs and receiving calls about hedgehogs out in the day.   With food sources gone, these hedgehogs will struggle to lay down the fat reserves needed to survive hibernation and need help immediately. 

THE WILDLIFE ORPHANAGE. A LOOK BACK AT 2016

October News

HEDGEHOGS, THE AUTUMN JUVENILES FLOOD IN!

Baby Pixie arrived weighing only 100g and has numerous problems
Pixie has to have Imaverol baths to clear his skin
Pixie is suffering from mites & ringworm and is in a bad way for such a tiny hedgehog

The Wildlife Orphanage has had an influx of small hedgehogs over the last few weeks.  These are the Autumn Juveniles, born late in the year.  They are often seen out in daytime and looking a bit wobbly.  Please act quickly if you see one as they go downhill rapidly. 

 

With winter just around the corner, these little hogs will be just too light for hibernation.  They need to put on lots of weight to see them through the winter.

 

If you see a tiny hedgehog roaming about, often in daylight,

Please ring 0771 1883072 for advice.